Frequently Asked Questions
Percutaneous Allergy Skin Testing

Procedure Description:
Percutaneous Allergy Skin Testing

What To Expect:
Most Allergy Testing can be accomplished at the time of your initial visit. Skin Prick testing is painless and takes about 30 minutes. Results are available immediately. Occasionally for more complex testing a separate visit must be scheduled such as for bee venom allergy or drug testing.

Preprocedure:
You should avoid taking antihistamines such as those found in prescription allergy medication such as Allegra, fexofenadine, Zyrtec, Clarinex as well as Over-the-counter medications such as Benadryl, loratidine, Claritin, chlorpheniramine, Atarax, hydrozyzine, meclizine and others. In addition, other medications especially antidepressants may block allergy tests so please call to check if you are uncertain as to what you can or cannot take.

Postprocedure:
Reactions to tests generally peak in 15 to 20 minutes and resolve within a few hours.


Contact Dermatitis Patch Testing

Procedure Description:
Topical Delayed Patch testing

What To Expect:
Contact dermatitis is a delayed type hypersensitivity reaction to chemicals encountered in our environment. These often include nickel, inks, dyes, preservatives, soap or lotion ingredients, rubber additives, glues, or a multitude of work related exposures. This sensitivity can be evaluated by a patch test which is worn for 48 to 72 hours generally on the back

Preprocedure:
Patches are placed during an office visit and affixed with non-allergenic paper tape. You should avoid antihistamines and any steroids prior to and during the tests...call for details

Postprocedure:
Tests are read at 72 and 96 hrs in the office. specific information will be provided to help with avoidance if an offending agent is found.


Drug Allergy Skin Testing

Procedure Description:
Penicillin testing

What To Expect:
Penicillin is a member of a large family of antibiotics.
Close "relatives" of penicillin include ampicillin and amoxicillin. Another large family of antibiotics called cephalosporins (sef-a-lo-spore-ins) is more distant cousin of penicillin. The same core chemical structure in penicillins is in cephalosporins. Members of the cephalosporin family include cefaclor (Ceclor), cefalexin (Keflex) and cefuroxime (Ceftin).
Although many new antibiotics have become available over the last several years, allergy to penicillin is still a significant problem for some patients. If you have a history of allergy to penicillin, some physicians may advise you to avoid all penicillins and cephalosporins. This can significantly limit the number of antibiotics you can take when you have a bacterial infection. Today, however, this is rarely necessary, as effective testing is available to determine if you are allergic to penicillin.

Preprocedure:
You should avoid antihistamines before the test (see "Allergy Testing" page.)The actual penicillin skin test is very simple and relatively painless, requiring several small skin pricks and some tiny intradermal injections on the arm. If a hive develops at the test site within 10 minutes the test is positive . Some patients are concerned about testing, particularly if they have a history of a bad reaction. When performed by an experienced allergist, penicillin skin testing has been proven to be very safe.

Postprocedure:
If your skin test is negative, you are able to take penicillin and all its relatives. If it is positive, you should take an alternative antibiotic. If you absolutely need to take penicillin (for example, if you are pregnant, and have syphilis), your allergist can desensitize you to the drug.
If you need to take a cephalosporin but have a history of allergy to penicillin, ideally, you should undergo penicillin skin testing. If it is negative, there is no problem. If it is positive, you can either take an alternate drug or undergo a cautious test dose, under your doctor's supervision. The incidence of cross-reactions between cephalosporins and penicillins is very low, but serious reactions occasionally have been reported.
While many patients may have a history of penicillin allergy, skin testing studies have shown that most of these patients are no longer allergic. If you have a history of allergy to penicillin or other drugs, be sure to discuss it with your allergist.


Staff Information

My staff consists of RNs and Registered Medical Assistants specially trained to provide care to allergy patients, including counseling and education as well as handle your sick calls, scheduling and refill requests

Worker's Compensation

Full Work Comp Services and IME in the realm of allergic respiratory and skin disorders including but not limited to Latex allergy, Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis, Allergic Contact Dermatitis and Allergic Asthma. Participate in the Missouri Baptist Work Comp Advantage Program sponsored by Missouri Baptist Medical Center. Call Mobap at 314-996-5943 for details. Or call my office directly at 314-469-5944



 



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